Moneyball

I love baseball. I love movies. I loved Moneyball:The Art of Winning an Unfair Game (the book). I did not love Moneyball (the movie). The book was crisply paced, concisely but completely explaining the newfound impact of statistical analysis on the tactics of assembling a winning baseball team from limited financial resources. It was not a compelling human interest story. As a result, I did not see how it could be adapted into a movie, other than a documentary. Nevertheless, the reviews on Moneyball have been excellent, with particular accolades for the performances of Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill. I just don’t get it. I thought the movie was slow and boring. The characters played by Pitt and Hill were monochromatic. And for anyone that does not know baseball intimately, the impact of advanced statistical analysis must still be incomprehensible. The only redeeming feature for me was Kerris Dorsey as Brad Pitt’s daughter, especially the sweet song that she sings to her dad to make us all feel like there is something important going on here. If and when you see it, tell me what I’m missing.

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2 Responses to Moneyball

  1. CMrok93 says:

    It may not feel quite like the classic baseball movie others have achieved, but it’s certainly pleasant enough to be enjoyable even by non-sports fan, and features great performances from Hill and Pitt. Good review. Check out my site when you can!

  2. Alexandra says:

    I know almost nothing about baseball and concur with Eddie’s comments about the movie.
    God knows some father might value his relationship with his offspring a little more after watching Moneyball.

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